theatlantic:

Here Is Every U.S. County’s Favorite Baseball Team (According to Facebook)

Happy Opening Day. What’s your favorite baseball team?
Wait, no, let me rephrase that: What’s the team you ‘like’ the most?
The Facebook Data Science has just answered that question for the whole country, at least at the county level. A representative of the team sent me the map above—here’s a link to a larger version.
Read more. [Image: Facebook Data Science]

theatlantic:

Here Is Every U.S. County’s Favorite Baseball Team (According to Facebook)

Happy Opening Day. What’s your favorite baseball team?

Wait, no, let me rephrase that: What’s the team you ‘like’ the most?

The Facebook Data Science has just answered that question for the whole country, at least at the county level. A representative of the team sent me the map above—here’s a link to a larger version.

Read more. [Image: Facebook Data Science]

Literally going to the movies by myself #grandbudapesthotel (at Regal Fenway Stadium 13 & RPX)

Literally going to the movies by myself #grandbudapesthotel (at Regal Fenway Stadium 13 & RPX)

FDR hurls the opening day pitch on April 18, 1938, a 12-8 Senators win over the Philadelphia A’s.

FDR hurls the opening day pitch on April 18, 1938, a 12-8 Senators win over the Philadelphia A’s.

theatlanticcities:

The fascinating remains of Rochester’s ‘subway.’
[Image: Flickr/Irina Souiki]

breakthecitysky:

kvknowsherfun:

popculturebrain:

Watch: Bruce Springsteen covers Lorde’s “Royals” in New Zealand

Yes. Good.

I wonder what it feels like to have Springsteen covering one of your songs.

(Source: youtube.com)

nprfreshair:

In a conversation with director Wes Anderson Terry asked why he often has his characters look at the camera/audience head-on. Here’s what he says:

"I have my own way of blocking things and framing things that’s built into me. I compare it to handwriting. I don’t fully understand it — why my handwriting is like this — but in a way there’s some sort of tonal thing with the kind of stories I do. They tend to have some fable element and I think my visual predilections are somehow related to trying to make that tone and make my own writing work with performers."

Photos of The Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic, The Darjeeling Limited, and The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best coffee in NYC by subway stop, now including Brooklyn.

Best coffee in NYC by subway stop, now including Brooklyn.

theatlantic:

Our Numbered Days: The Evolution of the Area Code

In the mid-20th century, in response to the United States’ rapidly expanding telephone network, executives at Bell System introduced a new way of dialing the phone. Until then, for the most part, it was human operators—mostly women—who had directed calls to their destinations.
Dialing systems had reflected this reliance on the vocal cord. Phone numbers weren’t numbers; they were alphanumeric addresses, named after phone exchanges that encompassed particular geographic areas. The Elizabeth Taylor movie Butterfield 8 gets its name from that system: The Butterfield exchange served the tony establishments of Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Lucy and Ricky Ricardo, should you care to call them, could be reached with a request for “Murray Hill 5-9975.” 
That system evolved, slowly. In 1955, AT&T—after it researched ways to minimize misunderstandings when it came to spoken phone directions—distributed a list of recommended exchange names featuring standardized abbreviations. (Butterfield 8 would have become, under that system, BU-8; Murray Hill 5-9975 reduced to, simply, MU 5-9975.) But engineers at Bell had been conducting their own research into the scalability of the name-and-number system. They had ambitions to expand the national phone network; their own research had concluded, among other things, that the country could not supply enough working women to meet its growing demand for human operators. Automation, the company concluded, would be the future of telephony. And “All-Number Calling”—no names, anymore, just digits—would be the way to get there.
Read more. [Image: Library of Congress]

theatlantic:

Our Numbered Days: The Evolution of the Area Code

In the mid-20th century, in response to the United States’ rapidly expanding telephone network, executives at Bell System introduced a new way of dialing the phone. Until then, for the most part, it was human operators—mostly women—who had directed calls to their destinations.

Dialing systems had reflected this reliance on the vocal cord. Phone numbers weren’t numbers; they were alphanumeric addresses, named after phone exchanges that encompassed particular geographic areas. The Elizabeth Taylor movie Butterfield 8 gets its name from that system: The Butterfield exchange served the tony establishments of Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Lucy and Ricky Ricardo, should you care to call them, could be reached with a request for “Murray Hill 5-9975.” 

That system evolved, slowly. In 1955, AT&T—after it researched ways to minimize misunderstandings when it came to spoken phone directions—distributed a list of recommended exchange names featuring standardized abbreviations. (Butterfield 8 would have become, under that system, BU-8; Murray Hill 5-9975 reduced to, simply, MU 5-9975.) But engineers at Bell had been conducting their own research into the scalability of the name-and-number system. They had ambitions to expand the national phone network; their own research had concluded, among other things, that the country could not supply enough working women to meet its growing demand for human operators. Automation, the company concluded, would be the future of telephony. And “All-Number Calling”—no names, anymore, just digits—would be the way to get there.

Read more. [Image: Library of Congress]